Belloh Williams fights ebola

Former student Belloh Williams (43) is going to her home country Liberia in November to help in the fight against ebola. Until then, she puts all of her energy into collecting as many supplies as possible.

Belloh Williams fights ebola

Belloh Williams fights ebola

Former student Belloh Williams (43) is going to her home country Liberia in November to help in the fight against ebola. Until then, she puts all of her energy into collecting as many supplies as possible.

Belloh Williams, who studied at Saxion in Enschede, received her diploma in Social Work and Service a few weeks ago. She is the chairperson of the Liberian Association Holland, an organisation that supports Liberians in the Netherlands, for example, by helping them integrate in society.

Together with Ben Brown from Deventer, she started a fundraiser. The two Liberians will be going back to their home country in November to deliver the supplies they collected. “Protective clothing is very important. As well as Dettol and chlorine, things that can easily be obtained in the Netherlands, make a big difference in Liberia.”

Civl war
Williams fled from the civil war plaguing western Africa fourteen years ago. The fear that she felt in relation to the war, is what her remaining relatives feel in relation to the ebola virus now. “I have thirteen brothers and sisters and I phone my family every day. Of course, there is the fear that they will be infected, but fortunately that has not happened so far.”

Williams sent her family money, so that they could by some basic protection. They now have buckets with pumps, containing water, chlorine and disinfectants. These are refreshed regularly, so that the whole neighbourhood can wash their hands there. “You see that people who are able to take good measures do not get infected”, Williams says. “But the other side of the story is that people are as poor as church mice. They have no money to buy things themselves. That is why we want to take supplies to as many people as possible.”

Corruption
There is an important reason for Williams and Brown to take the supplies to Liberia themselves. “There is a great deal of corruption in Liberia. The money does not end up or hardly ends up in the right place. And the supplies are offered for sale on the streets instead of donated to the people who really need them. I experienced war in Liberia for ten years myself, the same was happening then.”

Giving good information is another important reason for Belloh and Brown to travel to Liberia. “Ebola is hard to cure, but easily prevented. With good precautions, the risk is minimal. Furthermore, we hope that Liberians will accept good advice more easily as we’re are one them.”

Further information can be found on www.libinaction.com.

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